“…she stopped paying close attention to his words and when at red lights, examined the rain drops spattering on the windshield so intently that she almost stared right through them. Each drop seemed stuck on the glass, until another drop landed on it and they rolled down the window together, ending in a climactic splash.”


Sara: English major/Gender and Sexuality Studies minor, working at a nonprofit that gets young women ready for and interested in running for office/maybe soon applying to grad school, writer, clarinetist.

I post and reblog: things I think are pretty, things that intrigue me, things I'm a fan of, and things I care about.

Common themes include: books, writing, movies, more books, cozy beds, breakfasts, Doctor Who, Sherlock, feminist issues, and occasional pieces of my life.




"Vaccines protect the health of children in the United States so well that most parents today have never seen first-hand the devastating consequences of diseases now stopped by vaccines" —

CDC statement

Sorry truthers, there is no CDC cover up and vaccines still don’t cause autism 

(via real-justice-waluigi)

(Source: micdotcom, via esseekay)



"Potter has done too much for me for me to ever want to shit all over it. I’m never going to say: ‘Don’t ask me questions about that’. I remember reading an interview with Robert Smith from The Cure. Somebody said to him: ‘Why do you still wear all that makeup, don’t you feel a bit past it?’ And he said: ‘There are still 14-year-olds coming to see The Cure for the first time, dressed like that. I’d never want to make them feel silly.’ It’s a similar thing with Potter. People are still discovering those books and films. It would be awful for them to find out the people involved had turned their backs on it. Though sometimes, people do come up and say ‘I loved you in The Woman in Black,’ which is really sweet. That’s them knowing that it matters to me that I’ve done other stuff." — Daniel Radcliffe for London Magazine (x)

#what a right thinking human he has turned out to be
^THIS.

(Source: potterbird, via dearheart17)



Song Of The Day
Released eighteen years ago yesterday, “Wannabe” is a undisputed pop classic.

(Source: hitsvilleuk, via esseekay)


1 day ago • 4,390 notes • originally from hitsvilleuk
#reblogged #audio #music #wannabe #spice girls

meggannn:

kamiexe:

chicken-fingers:

this movie was way too heavy for its intended age group

it’s actually really perfect for all ages because when kids learn this stuff early in life it stays with them 

(Source: sometimes-alice, via dearheart17)


1 day ago • 195,370 notes • originally from sometimes-alice
#reblogged #photo #photoset #gif #gifs #the iron giant

(Source: twerkmaid, via dearheart17)


1 day ago • 46,336 notes • originally from twerkmaid
#reblogged #photo #twitter #tweet #bo burnham #sexism #misogyny #consent #privacy

DW +  Favorite Scenes

(via worldfallsdown)



candypriceless:

Fleetwood Mac | ‘Dreams’ 

(via worldfallsdown)


2 days ago • 15,550 notes • originally from candypriceless
#reblogged #audio #music #dreams #fleetwood mac

nova-r:

i need a new bra, looks like it’s time to take out a fucking loan

(via pipilottirist)


2 days ago • 68,873 notes • originally from nova-r
#ouch #too close to home #accurate #reblogged #text #bra #bras #bra shopping #life

(Source: oppabang, via killthefez)



rapturesrevenge:

madlori:

jmathieson-fic:

mumblingsage:

decodethefallenmoon:

molokoko:

amazing

“Just so everyone is aware, there is a bunch of misleading info being spread around re: ALS research - the “27%” figure is based on previous years’ annual funding; furthermore, the remainder goes to improving the quality of life of those suffering from ALS. Given that the annual funding is approximately 16M, that’s just over 4M spent on decreasing their suffering. It isn’t greed, it’s a lack of money.”Shut up already.

The ALS Association has a 4-star rating from Charity Watchdog. 
And the next time you start to complain about a charity either a) working on multiple fronts (because that’s what ALSA does—both seeking a cure and helping people suffering now) or b) daring to have administration expenses—let’s see how long you can last, much less tackle a cause, without printer paper and an internet connection. 

As someone who has watched a family member die from a neuro-degenerative disease; funding to develop better wheelchairs and bedsore creams is *just* as important as funding research to cure the disease itself…

A friend of mine posted an update from one of HER friends to FB earlier.  Her dad has ALS.  The ALS foundation came out to see if they could put in a ramp for his wheelchair, but they couldn’t afford it because of the kind of ramp he needed for the kind of house they had.
This week they called back and said hey, the thing is, we suddenly have a bunch of money, so we’re coming out to build that ramp.  And they did.  She posted pics.
So if you feel like bitching about the ice bucket challenge…reconsider.

There’s so much more the organisations like the ALSA and American Cancer Association besides “finding a cure.” They also put so much into making other things possible, including education. They have to, because no one else is going to. Education includes providing information to patients and their families, to doctors, and to the public at large.
Don’t bitch about these organisations. They do much, much more than look for cures. They do many great, wonderful things for the people dealing with these diseases right now.

My two cents as a nonprofit employee who’s done a lot of digging into our finances (as part of my job, not being creepy or anything): the standards that donors (corporations, foundations, etc.) look for are actually impossible. There is no way to actually do anything without spending a ton of money on “overhead”. That is to say, PEOPLE are expensive. And let me perfectly clear: the three of us at my org are rather UNDERpaid and we have ZERO benefits. And so what do orgs often have to do, according to those in the know who have given us advice? They publish budgets that might contain some fuzzy math on how much staff time is devoted to non-overhead tasks in order to spread out salaries and benefits into buckets that look good to donors.
When really, it would be nice if donors, you know, recognized the value of the people doing the work and didn’t create artificially low ceilings for how to reflect that value in a public budget.

rapturesrevenge:

madlori:

jmathieson-fic:

mumblingsage:

decodethefallenmoon:

molokoko:

amazing

Just so everyone is aware, there is a bunch of misleading info being spread around re: ALS research - the “27%” figure is based on previous years’ annual funding; furthermore, the remainder goes to improving the quality of life of those suffering from ALS. Given that the annual funding is approximately 16M, that’s just over 4M spent on decreasing their suffering. It isn’t greed, it’s a lack of money.”

Shut up already.

The ALS Association has a 4-star rating from Charity Watchdog. 

And the next time you start to complain about a charity either a) working on multiple fronts (because that’s what ALSA does—both seeking a cure and helping people suffering now) or b) daring to have administration expenses—let’s see how long you can last, much less tackle a cause, without printer paper and an internet connection. 

As someone who has watched a family member die from a neuro-degenerative disease; funding to develop better wheelchairs and bedsore creams is *just* as important as funding research to cure the disease itself…

A friend of mine posted an update from one of HER friends to FB earlier.  Her dad has ALS.  The ALS foundation came out to see if they could put in a ramp for his wheelchair, but they couldn’t afford it because of the kind of ramp he needed for the kind of house they had.

This week they called back and said hey, the thing is, we suddenly have a bunch of money, so we’re coming out to build that ramp.  And they did.  She posted pics.

So if you feel like bitching about the ice bucket challenge…reconsider.

There’s so much more the organisations like the ALSA and American Cancer Association besides “finding a cure.” They also put so much into making other things possible, including education. They have to, because no one else is going to. Education includes providing information to patients and their families, to doctors, and to the public at large.

Don’t bitch about these organisations. They do much, much more than look for cures. They do many great, wonderful things for the people dealing with these diseases right now.

My two cents as a nonprofit employee who’s done a lot of digging into our finances (as part of my job, not being creepy or anything): the standards that donors (corporations, foundations, etc.) look for are actually impossible. There is no way to actually do anything without spending a ton of money on “overhead”. That is to say, PEOPLE are expensive. And let me perfectly clear: the three of us at my org are rather UNDERpaid and we have ZERO benefits. And so what do orgs often have to do, according to those in the know who have given us advice? They publish budgets that might contain some fuzzy math on how much staff time is devoted to non-overhead tasks in order to spread out salaries and benefits into buckets that look good to donors.

When really, it would be nice if donors, you know, recognized the value of the people doing the work and didn’t create artificially low ceilings for how to reflect that value in a public budget.

(via esseekay)



jomarch:


Ok, so, I work for an org that works to get young women interested in politics, but we also do tons of mentoring, particularly surrounding the young women in our network needing help getting a job.

It’s incredibly common to feel like there aren’t any jobs—even entry-level jobs—that you’re totally qualified for. Everyone’s familiar with the entry-level position that requires 3 years of experience, right? Or there’s a job you can totally see yourself doing and loving and excelling at, but they have a list of 15 qualifications and you only meet 8.

So, what do you do?
Well, here’s my answer, based on being jointly responsible for hiring multiple rounds of interns, on hearing from tons of professionals about their career paths, and on hearing direct advice from professionals who hire people:
***Don’t make the mistake of only applying to things you feel perfectly qualified for based on the descriptions!***

More advice with plenty of gifs below. Seriously, it’s good info and includes a great example of a really cool woman who works at the White House!

Read More

jomarch:

Ok, so, I work for an org that works to get young women interested in politics, but we also do tons of mentoring, particularly surrounding the young women in our network needing help getting a job.

image

It’s incredibly common to feel like there aren’t any jobs—even entry-level jobs—that you’re totally qualified for. Everyone’s familiar with the entry-level position that requires 3 years of experience, right? Or there’s a job you can totally see yourself doing and loving and excelling at, but they have a list of 15 qualifications and you only meet 8.

image

So, what do you do?

Well, here’s my answer, based on being jointly responsible for hiring multiple rounds of interns, on hearing from tons of professionals about their career paths, and on hearing direct advice from professionals who hire people:

***Don’t make the mistake of only applying to things you feel perfectly qualified for based on the descriptions!***

image

More advice with plenty of gifs below. Seriously, it’s good info and includes a great example of a really cool woman who works at the White House!

Read More



i am only too much because you are inadequate 

(Source: lesbianspaceprincex, via pipilottirist)


4 days ago • 1,390 notes • originally from lesbianspaceprincex
#accurate #reblogged #text #life #advice

notecardlover:

Folding Chair —Regina Spektor

"Come and open up your folding chair next to me. My feet are buried in the sand and there’s a breeze."

(via esseekay)


4 days ago • 1,185 notes • originally from notecardlover
#reblogged #audio #music #regina spektor #folding chair

(Source: jufroh, via esseekay)


4 days ago • 2,706 notes • originally from jufroh
#reblogged #photo #kitchen #kettle

Here’s some fantastic news for your Friday: On Thursday, the California Senate unanimously approved a new bill that defines sexual consent as a firm “yes” rather than a lack of “no.” 

micdotcom:

This is a big win for anti-rape activists, many of whom have been touting the necessity of an “affirmative consent” standard for years. California Gov. Jerry Brown (D) has the next month to sign the bill into law. If he does, schools across the state would be required to define consent before engaging in sexual activity as an “affirmative, conscious, and voluntary agreement” or risk losing state financial aid funding.

(via pipilottirist)