“…she stopped paying close attention to his words and when at red lights, examined the rain drops spattering on the windshield so intently that she almost stared right through them. Each drop seemed stuck on the glass, until another drop landed on it and they rolled down the window together, ending in a climactic splash.”


Sara: English major/Gender and Sexuality Studies minor, working at a nonprofit that gets young women ready for and interested in running for office/maybe soon applying to grad school, writer, clarinetist.

I post and reblog: things I think are pretty, things that intrigue me, things I'm a fan of, and things I care about.

Common themes include: books, writing, movies, more books, cozy beds, breakfasts, Doctor Who, Sherlock, feminist issues, and occasional pieces of my life.




Did you kill your wife, Nick? - Gone Girl (Dir, David Fincher 2014)



#DC #summer fluke: needing a sweater on the way to work. What is happening?!

#DC #summer fluke: needing a sweater on the way to work. What is happening?!



Delicious results of yesterday’s cooking extravaganza: dinner for several days and various protein-rich breakfast options for the week. Yum! 

  1. More or less Nigella Lawson’s Curry in a HurryGUYS, CURRY PASTE IS A BEAUTIFUL THING.
  2. Quinoa Egg Bake
  3. Baked Breakfast Turkey Patties
  4. Wheat-Free Pancakes (I added vanilla). Here topped with vanilla Greek yogurt and strawberries. So tasty! SO EXPENSIVE, OH MY GOD ALMOND MEAL IS PRICEY.

I only consciously made the pancakes gluten free, and even then, I was using that recipe because it’s high in protein, not because I care about being gluten free. HOWEVER, it appears that EVERYTHING I made should be gluten free. 



gradientlair:

#NotJustHello is a recent Twitter dialogue (started by @Karnythia) on how street harassment is not just about men not being able to say “hello” to women (though all who experience street harassment aren’t necessarily “women” or ID as such). Above are some of my tweets during that conversation. The idea that it is women “preventing” hello is not just a violently gross lie, but a mass oversimplification of the verbal/physical abuse and even sexual assault/murder that comes about via street harassment. 

Anyone who thinks all I describe above is okay clearly supports violence. None of these actions (and I’ve experienced much worse; some I don’t even discuss online) above are about saying “hello.” It’s one of the reasons why I included "so I can’t say hello?" in my Street Harassment and Street Harassment + Misogynoir BINGO card, that I included again in this post.

The first time I posted the BINGO card is in my recent post about my experiences, my writing on street harassment as experienced as a Black woman and the anti-street harassment chat #YouOkSis (by @Russian_Starr and @FeministaJonesscheduled for Thursday, July 10th at 12pm. In this aforementioned post (and within my years of writing on the topic) I address why some people want Black women silenced on this topic (and in general) and how the racist and anti-intersectional mainstream media framing and centering of White women as the only victims of street harassment with Black men as only perpetrators removes other men’s culpability and again, silences Black women. This is a time and space for Black women to speak our truths.

Related Post: Street Harassment Is Violence (Essay Compilation)

(via sorayachemaly)



flairey:

my officemates and i were arguing about the difference between a mouse and a rat so i googled it
and there we go
the difference is a rat plays jazz

flairey:

my officemates and i were arguing about the difference between a mouse and a rat so i googled it

and there we go

the difference is a rat plays jazz

(via pipilottirist)


1 day ago • 154,361 notes • originally from flairey
#accurate #reblogged #photo #text #mouse #rat #jazz #saxophone

093. The Sunday Times magazine (photoshoot and interview)

"There’ll be no flirting, that’s for sure.  It’s not what this Doctor is concerned with.  It’s quite a fun relationship, but no, I did call and say ‘I want no Papa-Nicole moments’.  I think there was a bit of tension with that at first, but I was absolutely adamant."

Read (1 - 2 - 3) / Photos (x)

(via valeria2067)



(Source: artbymoga, via idratherbereading)


1 day ago • 27,539 notes • originally from artbymoga
#oooh yes #perfection #reblogged #photo #gif #books #reading #lit #literature #rain #raining #cozy

"I must remind you that starving a child is violence. Suppressing a culture is violence. Neglecting school children is violence. Punishing a mother and her family is violence. Discrimination against a working man is violence. Ghetto housing is violence. Ignoring medical need is violence. Contempt for poverty is violence." — Coretta Scott King (via samirathejerk)

(via newwavefeminism)



@wmata people greeted us at #tysonscorner with commemorative flags! #silverline

@wmata people greeted us at #tysonscorner with commemorative flags! #silverline



Taking the @wmata #silverline on its opening day!



Goodbye my almost lover
Goodbye my hopeless dream
I’m trying not to think about you
Can’t you just let me be?

(Source: melodies-under-a-glowing-sun, via idratherbereading)



"Since dedicating myself to getting into “superhero shape,” several articles regarding my weight have been brought to my attention. Claims have been made that I’ve been on a strict workout routine regulated by co-stars, whipped into shape by trainers I’ve never met, eating sprouted grains I can’t pronounce and ultimately losing 14 pounds off my 5’3” frame. Losing 14 pounds out of necessity in order to live a healthier life is a huge victory. I’m a petite person to begin with, so the idea of my losing this amount of weight is utter lunacy. If I were to lose 14 pounds, I’d have to part with both arms. And a foot. I’m frustrated with the irresponsibility of tabloid media who sell the public ideas about what we should look like and how we should get there." —

Scarlett Johansson for the Huffington Post [x]

More of her brilliant articles can be found here.

(via theshadowsinthesun)

(Source: ramblingraconteur, via valeria2067)



capitaldee:

unhistorical:

Greatest Olympic Moments: Jesse Owens, Berlin, August 1936.

In August of 1936, American athlete Jesse Owens won four gold medals, setting three world records and tying a fourth in the 100 yard dash - all in front of Adolf Hitler, who had planned to use the Games as a tool to promote the physical superiority of the Aryan race. 

Video here.

I don’t think anyone could understand how important this man is to me.

(via feminist-space)



Belle (UK, 2013)

(Source: in-love-with-movies, via markcampbells)


2 days ago • 939 notes • originally from in-love-with-movies
#reblogged #photo #photoset #gif #gifs #belle

Ok, so, I work for an org that works to get young women interested in politics, but we also do tons of mentoring, particularly surrounding the young women in our network needing help getting a job.

It’s incredibly common to feel like there aren’t any jobs—even entry-level jobs—that you’re totally qualified for. Everyone’s familiar with the entry-level position that requires 3 years of experience, right? Or there’s a job you can totally see yourself doing and loving and excelling at, but they have a list of 15 qualifications and you only meet 8.

So, what do you do?
Well, here’s my answer, based on being jointly responsible for hiring multiple rounds of interns, on hearing from tons of professionals about their career paths, and on hearing direct advice from professionals who hire people:
***Don’t make the mistake of only applying to things you feel perfectly qualified for based on the descriptions!***

More advice with plenty of gifs below. Seriously, it’s good info and includes a great example of a really cool woman who works at the White House!
[[MORE]]Apparently, this perspective is a widespread trend among women in particular: the idea that if you only meet maybe 6 of 10 qualifications that it’s not worth applying. Not true! A huge part of a successful application is finding relevant examples and spinning the heck out of them to show how great you’d be for a job so that the hiring manager, or whoever, sees that you’d be a great fit even if you don’t already know how to use a particular database, or whatever.
Through work, I know a woman who currently works as a speech writer for the First Lady and also works with the White House Council on Women and Girls who was previously a speech writer for the President. She had to be asked THREE times to apply for the Presidential speech writing job by a colleague involved in the hiring process because she didn’t think she was qualified or experienced enough, but she finally went for it and look where it got her!

My work is encouraging young women to see themselves as political leaders and run for office, and this anecdote pops up in our world all the time: while men often wake up and just think, “Yeah, I think I’ll run for President, or Senator, etc.” women who are EQUALLY AS UN-/QUALIFIED worry that they’re not ready and don’t have enough qualifications. But of course they do. There are no formal qualifications aside from age, residency, and sometimes citizenship, and not only that, but the men who just decide to run (and who WIN) are their peers, with just as much or little education and experience as they have. This difference in the self-assessment of qualifications definitely exists in the nonpolitical job hunt world, as well.
Despite job descriptions often seeming to have strict formal qualifications, those are more like guidelines for the totally perfect skills for the job.

But the fact is, almost nobody has every single qualification and employers tend to highly value but not list out attributes like being a good fit in the office, being a quick learner, and taking initiative. Often, these attributes easily outweigh a few pesky details, especially if they think you’ll be able to learn quickly enough on the job.

The other important element is that, especially these days, getting a job can be a bit of a numbers game. You really have to be submitting as many applications as you can rapidly churn out. Like probably at least a dozen or a few dozen a week. People can submit 50 applications and only get 2 requests for an interview.

tl;dr: You have to apply to a sickening number of jobs to get enough positive responses to work from, and you have to just go ahead and reach for positions you’re not sure you’re totally qualified for. Because plenty of people just as qualified or not as you are getting those jobs. Make sure you also have a chance by at least sending in an application.
Go do!

Ok, so, I work for an org that works to get young women interested in politics, but we also do tons of mentoring, particularly surrounding the young women in our network needing help getting a job.

image

It’s incredibly common to feel like there aren’t any jobs—even entry-level jobs—that you’re totally qualified for. Everyone’s familiar with the entry-level position that requires 3 years of experience, right? Or there’s a job you can totally see yourself doing and loving and excelling at, but they have a list of 15 qualifications and you only meet 8.

image

So, what do you do?

Well, here’s my answer, based on being jointly responsible for hiring multiple rounds of interns, on hearing from tons of professionals about their career paths, and on hearing direct advice from professionals who hire people:

***Don’t make the mistake of only applying to things you feel perfectly qualified for based on the descriptions!***

image

More advice with plenty of gifs below. Seriously, it’s good info and includes a great example of a really cool woman who works at the White House!

Read More